“ Which brings me to a sad, but true, story. Which might explain why these books sometimes, sometimes, don’t get into your hands. Because no-one tells you about them.

When Ash was first launched here in the UK, I went to a ‘meet and greet’ with a large selection of booksellers. Now these were invited to HarperCollins HQ, so were the chosen few.

I waltzed around the room, telling them how excited I was that Ash was coming out, how it delved into mythology, history and just EPIC heroicness.

Then I met a bookseller who nodded politely then said:

“I can’t see the point stocking it. We’ve no Indians in our town.”

Well, I doubt she had any hobbits either but I bet she sold a few copies of The Hobbit and Lord of The Rings in her shop. ”
#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series SPECIAL with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s BookDragon!
If you liked Goldilocks and the Three Bears, try Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim because both are timeless tales about curious - albeit hungry and sleepy - little girls. Yim seamlessly extends her story to include friendship and second chances. Click here for the Smithsonian BookDragon review.

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series SPECIAL with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s BookDragon!

If you liked Goldilocks and the Three Bears, try Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim because both are timeless tales about curious - albeit hungry and sleepy - little girls. Yim seamlessly extends her story to include friendship and second chances. Click here for the Smithsonian BookDragon review.

disabilityinkidlit:

Want to win books featuring disabled characters?
A lovely YA fantasy novel featuring a protagonist who uses crutches?
A not-yet-released YA contemporary novel about a young actress struggling with OCD?
Then go visit those links, because there’s only five days to win a signed paperback of The Elementals, and only one more day left to win a signed advance copy of Don’t Touch. Your odds look great, and entering is incredibly easy.
Keep an eye on Disability in Kidlit this July, because we’ll be doing several more giveaways like this!
disabilityinkidlit:

Want to win books featuring disabled characters?
A lovely YA fantasy novel featuring a protagonist who uses crutches?
A not-yet-released YA contemporary novel about a young actress struggling with OCD?
Then go visit those links, because there’s only five days to win a signed paperback of The Elementals, and only one more day left to win a signed advance copy of Don’t Touch. Your odds look great, and entering is incredibly easy.
Keep an eye on Disability in Kidlit this July, because we’ll be doing several more giveaways like this!

disabilityinkidlit:

Want to win books featuring disabled characters?

A lovely YA fantasy novel featuring a protagonist who uses crutches?

A not-yet-released YA contemporary novel about a young actress struggling with OCD?

Then go visit those links, because there’s only five days to win a signed paperback of The Elementals, and only one more day left to win a signed advance copy of Don’t Touch. Your odds look great, and entering is incredibly easy.

Keep an eye on Disability in Kidlit this July, because we’ll be doing several more giveaways like this!

Um I don't know off y'all take suggestions or not but if you do I highly recommend Girl Overboard. It was one of my all time favorites when I was younger it talks a lot about Chinese culture and the importance of staying true to yourself. I honestly don't even know if it would count as a diverse enough book but it is amazing none the less

Girl Overboard by Justina Chen!

WNDB welcomes Don Tate to our team!

image

Please join us in welcoming our new member Don Tate! He is the author of IT JES’ HAPPENED (Lee & Low Books, 2102), an Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Honor winner, and POET: THE REMARKABLE STORY OF GEORGE MOSES HORTON OF CHAPEL HILL (Peachtree, 2015).

In addition to being an award-winning author, Don is also the illustrator of numerous critically acclaimed books for children. Some of the books he’s illustrated include THE AMAZING AGE OF JOHN ROY LYNCH (Eerdmans, 2015); THE CART THAT CARRIED MARTIN (Charlesbridge); HOPE’S GIFT (Penguin); DUKE ELLINGTON’S NUTCRACKER SUITE (Charlesbridge); SHE LOVED BASEBALL (HarperCollins).  

Don is one of the founding hosts of the blog The Brown Bookshelf, a blog dedicated to raising the awareness of African American youth literature creators. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his family.

Congratulations on the impressive accomplishments, Don! And welcome to the team!

We Need Diverse Books Announces Incorporation as a Non-Profit and Inaugural Advisory Board

Grassroots organization files for incorporation as a non-profit organization in the state of Pennsylvania, and welcomes its first advisory board members, authors Grace Lin, Jacqueline Woodson, Matt de la Peña, Cynthia Leitich Smith, and Cindy Pon
 
New York City, NY  (July 28, 2014) More than just a hashtag, We Need Diverse Books is a grassroots organization created to address the lack of diverse, non-majority narratives in children’s literature.  We Need Diverse Books is committed to the ideal that embracing diversity will lead to acceptance, empathy, and ultimately equality. Its mission is to promote or amplify diversification efforts and increase visibility for diverse books and authors, with a goal of empowering a wide range of readers in the process.             
 
In order to accomplish its mission, We Need Diverse Books reaches out to individuals and groups involved in many levels of children’s publishing—including but not limited to publishers, authors, distributors, booksellers, librarians, educators, parents, and students.  “Incorporating will give us the legitimacy and standing we need to move forward with our mission,” says Lamar Giles, VP of Communications. “We have many exciting projects in the works.”
 
In addition to a Diversity Festival planned for 2016, We Need Diverse Books plans to initiate a grant program to support diverse authors, bring Diversity into the Classroom with collaborations with First Book and the National Education Association, and develop a “diversity toolkit” for librarians and booksellers.
 
Inaugural advisory board members includes Grace Lin, Jacqueline Woodson, Matt de la Peña, Cynthia Leitich Smith, and Cindy Pon. “Each of these members has a history of advocating for diverse books, and is a pioneer in the field of children’s literature. They will not only increase our visibility as an organization, but light the way going forward,” said Ellen Oh, President of We Need Diverse Books.
 
On the heels of its enormously successful panel at the inaugural Book Con, the We Need Diverse Books team has been invited by the New Atlantic Independent Booksellers Association (NAIBA) to present the first ever diverse author signing and reception, and present panels at the Baltimore Book Festival, National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the American Library Association (ALA), and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI), among others.

Anonymous asked:
In your post about diversity in writing; you wrote that not including POC is bad, but there are areas without POC. I still remember the surprised feel when I saw a person that wasn't pale like milk the first time in my life. I was already close to puberty. (Family was poor, so no travels abroad.) Writing about my home, my childhood or similar things would feel unnatural for me to have POC in them. I don't know how to feel about this, since I don't want them to feel left out.

elloellenoh:

Dear Anon,

I’m actually really glad you asked this question because I wrote this post before the WNDB campaign started. I would love to redo that post to change POC to include all marginalized people because LGBTQIA and people with disabilities and all different religious backgrounds come in all colors. So when I talk about adding diversity to everyone’s writing, I truly mean ALL diversity, not just POC. And I have a feeling that while you might never have seen a POC growing up, I’m sure you have met someone in your life who is underrepresented and needs a voice in literature.  So thank you for asking this question and letting me clarify this point. It is a really important one for me.

Best,

Ellen

A huge warm welcome to our Library Liaison Allie Jane Bruce!

Please give a warm welcome to our newest member and Library Liaison Allie Jane Bruce! 

image

A Children’s Librarian at the Bank Street College of Education, Allie works on a project with 6th-graders that explores diversity, identity, and advocacy through children’s literature. She received her Master’s in Library Science from The Pratt Institute, reviews children’s books for Shelf Awareness, and will serve on the 2016 Newbery Committee. She began her career as a bookseller at Politics and Prose Bookstore in Washington, DC. When not working, Allie is usually listening to the Beatles or watching Avatar: The Last Airbender.

You can connect with her on Twitter at @alliejanebruce. Hooray and welcome to the team, Allie! 

disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 
disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14
George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). To Be Takei documentary official website. - Mod Dawes Sr. 

disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). 

Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). 

To Be Takei documentary official website. 

- Mod Dawes Sr. 

(via mzchristie)

Kody Keplinger interviews Rachel M. Wilson + DON’T TOUCH giveaway! | Disability in Kidlit

disabilityinkidlit:

Kody: I think a lot of people think it’s easy to write your own disability, but in my experience, it can be tricky. How was this experience for you? Were there any challenges you faced in writing about a character with OCD?

Rachel: Yes, I found it very tricky. First off, OCD can consist of many different obsessions and compulsions at once, and these are often hard for someone without OCD to understand. Media portrayals of OCD often stick to neat freaks obsessed with cleanliness or germs, but most of my own fears and compulsions were much more “creative.” For example, for years I avoided gum and blueberries like the plague for fear of blowing up like Violet in Willy Wonka.

All the different symptoms in my first draft overwhelmed my early readers and took away from a coherent story arc. My last advisor at Vermont College of Fine Arts, Martine Leavitt, wisely encouraged me to narrow my focus, and at that point I zeroed in on touch. I considered presenting Caddie’s fear as a phobia, but that didn’t fit in with her magical thinking. Eventually, I found a balance by acknowledging that Caddie has other symptoms without spending too much time with them on the page.”

[read the rest of the interview!]

In honor of Disability in Kidlit's one-year anniversary, you have a chance to win a signed advance copy of Rachel M. Wilson’s upcoming YA contemporary novel Don’t Touch, which features a protagonist dealing with OCD. Simply leave a comment on the WordPress post or reblog this Tumblr post. (Yes, doing both increases your chances!) In one week, we’ll select a single winner from one of these locations. This giveaway is open to US and CA addresses.

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series SPECIAL with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s BookDragon!
If you liked If I Stay by Gayle Forman, try Every Day by David Levithan because both are heart-wrenching, kleenex reaching tales of separated teen lovers joined at the soul, depserate to be together in spite of impossible circumstances beyond their control. In David Levithan’s Everyday, love transcends gender, orientation, race, culture, daily. Click here to be taken to the BookDragon review.

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series SPECIAL with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s BookDragon!

If you liked If I Stay by Gayle Forman, try Every Day by David Levithan because both are heart-wrenching, kleenex reaching tales of separated teen lovers joined at the soul, depserate to be together in spite of impossible circumstances beyond their control. In David Levithan’s Everyday, love transcends gender, orientation, race, culture, daily. Click here to be taken to the BookDragon review.

1 of 108
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...