Indigenous Literacy Day 3 September 2014

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:
The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi

“Three characters take turns narrating foreign correspondent Abawi’s debut, about a cross-cultural love affair that tears at a small Afghan community. … A suspenseful, enlightening, and hopeful love story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Zac & Mia by A. J. Betts (HMH Books for Young Readers)

“Seventeen-year-old Zac is recovering from a bone marrow transplant when a loud new patient moves into the room next door. While Zac thinks he knows all there is to know about cancer…Mia’s arrival proves that he does not know everything. The two develop a friendship and learn to see beyond their own sickness and circumstances. … Zac & Mia holds its own as a smart, well-crafted story about the importance of friendship and feeling understood.” — School Library Journal, starred review

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont (Atheneum)

“Wren’s infatuation with handsome charmer Tim takes on an unexpected emotional depth after Tim reveals that he is gay. Their friendship blossoms as she becomes a fiercely loyal defender of his secret, while he offers her emotional support during her family’s financial struggles. … Thoughtful parallels between discrimination based on race and sexual orientation are also skillfully interwoven.While not romantic, Wren and Tim’s relationship becomes another powerful iteration of the book’s message that ”[l]ove is love,“ and all loves deserve respect.” — Kirkus

Rabbit Ears by Maggie de Vries (HarperCollins)

Book Description: Kaya, who is adopted and multiracial, has just been released from a Youth Detention Centre and is carrying a painful secret: she was sexually abused by a neighbor for years. Kaya keeps away, repeatedly disappearing into a life of sex work and addiction. Meanwhile, her sister, Beth, uses food and a rediscovered love of magic tricks to escape her own troubles. Though both girls struggle through darkness and pain, they eventually find their way towards a moment of illumination and healing.
This powerful YA novel is rooted in the tragic life of the author’s sister, Sarah-a victim of serial killer Robert Pickton and the subject of Maggie de Vries’s Governor General’s Literary Award-nominated memoir for adults, Missing Sarah. Sarah’s experiences as an abused child and teen runaway inspired the character Kaya, and she appears in the story when Kaya meets her on the streets. Set in 1998, Vancouver’s missing women form a subtle backdrop for the story.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson (HarperTeen)

“Caddie is starting over: she’s earned a spot at the performing arts high school for her junior year, and reconnects with an old friend in doing so. … This novel offers a good look at Obesseive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, though it stops short of exploring treatment and recovery.” — School Library Journal
diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:
The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi

“Three characters take turns narrating foreign correspondent Abawi’s debut, about a cross-cultural love affair that tears at a small Afghan community. … A suspenseful, enlightening, and hopeful love story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Zac & Mia by A. J. Betts (HMH Books for Young Readers)

“Seventeen-year-old Zac is recovering from a bone marrow transplant when a loud new patient moves into the room next door. While Zac thinks he knows all there is to know about cancer…Mia’s arrival proves that he does not know everything. The two develop a friendship and learn to see beyond their own sickness and circumstances. … Zac & Mia holds its own as a smart, well-crafted story about the importance of friendship and feeling understood.” — School Library Journal, starred review

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont (Atheneum)

“Wren’s infatuation with handsome charmer Tim takes on an unexpected emotional depth after Tim reveals that he is gay. Their friendship blossoms as she becomes a fiercely loyal defender of his secret, while he offers her emotional support during her family’s financial struggles. … Thoughtful parallels between discrimination based on race and sexual orientation are also skillfully interwoven.While not romantic, Wren and Tim’s relationship becomes another powerful iteration of the book’s message that ”[l]ove is love,“ and all loves deserve respect.” — Kirkus

Rabbit Ears by Maggie de Vries (HarperCollins)

Book Description: Kaya, who is adopted and multiracial, has just been released from a Youth Detention Centre and is carrying a painful secret: she was sexually abused by a neighbor for years. Kaya keeps away, repeatedly disappearing into a life of sex work and addiction. Meanwhile, her sister, Beth, uses food and a rediscovered love of magic tricks to escape her own troubles. Though both girls struggle through darkness and pain, they eventually find their way towards a moment of illumination and healing.
This powerful YA novel is rooted in the tragic life of the author’s sister, Sarah-a victim of serial killer Robert Pickton and the subject of Maggie de Vries’s Governor General’s Literary Award-nominated memoir for adults, Missing Sarah. Sarah’s experiences as an abused child and teen runaway inspired the character Kaya, and she appears in the story when Kaya meets her on the streets. Set in 1998, Vancouver’s missing women form a subtle backdrop for the story.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson (HarperTeen)

“Caddie is starting over: she’s earned a spot at the performing arts high school for her junior year, and reconnects with an old friend in doing so. … This novel offers a good look at Obesseive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, though it stops short of exploring treatment and recovery.” — School Library Journal
diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:
The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi

“Three characters take turns narrating foreign correspondent Abawi’s debut, about a cross-cultural love affair that tears at a small Afghan community. … A suspenseful, enlightening, and hopeful love story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Zac & Mia by A. J. Betts (HMH Books for Young Readers)

“Seventeen-year-old Zac is recovering from a bone marrow transplant when a loud new patient moves into the room next door. While Zac thinks he knows all there is to know about cancer…Mia’s arrival proves that he does not know everything. The two develop a friendship and learn to see beyond their own sickness and circumstances. … Zac & Mia holds its own as a smart, well-crafted story about the importance of friendship and feeling understood.” — School Library Journal, starred review

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont (Atheneum)

“Wren’s infatuation with handsome charmer Tim takes on an unexpected emotional depth after Tim reveals that he is gay. Their friendship blossoms as she becomes a fiercely loyal defender of his secret, while he offers her emotional support during her family’s financial struggles. … Thoughtful parallels between discrimination based on race and sexual orientation are also skillfully interwoven.While not romantic, Wren and Tim’s relationship becomes another powerful iteration of the book’s message that ”[l]ove is love,“ and all loves deserve respect.” — Kirkus

Rabbit Ears by Maggie de Vries (HarperCollins)

Book Description: Kaya, who is adopted and multiracial, has just been released from a Youth Detention Centre and is carrying a painful secret: she was sexually abused by a neighbor for years. Kaya keeps away, repeatedly disappearing into a life of sex work and addiction. Meanwhile, her sister, Beth, uses food and a rediscovered love of magic tricks to escape her own troubles. Though both girls struggle through darkness and pain, they eventually find their way towards a moment of illumination and healing.
This powerful YA novel is rooted in the tragic life of the author’s sister, Sarah-a victim of serial killer Robert Pickton and the subject of Maggie de Vries’s Governor General’s Literary Award-nominated memoir for adults, Missing Sarah. Sarah’s experiences as an abused child and teen runaway inspired the character Kaya, and she appears in the story when Kaya meets her on the streets. Set in 1998, Vancouver’s missing women form a subtle backdrop for the story.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson (HarperTeen)

“Caddie is starting over: she’s earned a spot at the performing arts high school for her junior year, and reconnects with an old friend in doing so. … This novel offers a good look at Obesseive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, though it stops short of exploring treatment and recovery.” — School Library Journal
diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:
The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi

“Three characters take turns narrating foreign correspondent Abawi’s debut, about a cross-cultural love affair that tears at a small Afghan community. … A suspenseful, enlightening, and hopeful love story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Zac & Mia by A. J. Betts (HMH Books for Young Readers)

“Seventeen-year-old Zac is recovering from a bone marrow transplant when a loud new patient moves into the room next door. While Zac thinks he knows all there is to know about cancer…Mia’s arrival proves that he does not know everything. The two develop a friendship and learn to see beyond their own sickness and circumstances. … Zac & Mia holds its own as a smart, well-crafted story about the importance of friendship and feeling understood.” — School Library Journal, starred review

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont (Atheneum)

“Wren’s infatuation with handsome charmer Tim takes on an unexpected emotional depth after Tim reveals that he is gay. Their friendship blossoms as she becomes a fiercely loyal defender of his secret, while he offers her emotional support during her family’s financial struggles. … Thoughtful parallels between discrimination based on race and sexual orientation are also skillfully interwoven.While not romantic, Wren and Tim’s relationship becomes another powerful iteration of the book’s message that ”[l]ove is love,“ and all loves deserve respect.” — Kirkus

Rabbit Ears by Maggie de Vries (HarperCollins)

Book Description: Kaya, who is adopted and multiracial, has just been released from a Youth Detention Centre and is carrying a painful secret: she was sexually abused by a neighbor for years. Kaya keeps away, repeatedly disappearing into a life of sex work and addiction. Meanwhile, her sister, Beth, uses food and a rediscovered love of magic tricks to escape her own troubles. Though both girls struggle through darkness and pain, they eventually find their way towards a moment of illumination and healing.
This powerful YA novel is rooted in the tragic life of the author’s sister, Sarah-a victim of serial killer Robert Pickton and the subject of Maggie de Vries’s Governor General’s Literary Award-nominated memoir for adults, Missing Sarah. Sarah’s experiences as an abused child and teen runaway inspired the character Kaya, and she appears in the story when Kaya meets her on the streets. Set in 1998, Vancouver’s missing women form a subtle backdrop for the story.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson (HarperTeen)

“Caddie is starting over: she’s earned a spot at the performing arts high school for her junior year, and reconnects with an old friend in doing so. … This novel offers a good look at Obesseive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, though it stops short of exploring treatment and recovery.” — School Library Journal
diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:
The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi

“Three characters take turns narrating foreign correspondent Abawi’s debut, about a cross-cultural love affair that tears at a small Afghan community. … A suspenseful, enlightening, and hopeful love story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Zac & Mia by A. J. Betts (HMH Books for Young Readers)

“Seventeen-year-old Zac is recovering from a bone marrow transplant when a loud new patient moves into the room next door. While Zac thinks he knows all there is to know about cancer…Mia’s arrival proves that he does not know everything. The two develop a friendship and learn to see beyond their own sickness and circumstances. … Zac & Mia holds its own as a smart, well-crafted story about the importance of friendship and feeling understood.” — School Library Journal, starred review

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont (Atheneum)

“Wren’s infatuation with handsome charmer Tim takes on an unexpected emotional depth after Tim reveals that he is gay. Their friendship blossoms as she becomes a fiercely loyal defender of his secret, while he offers her emotional support during her family’s financial struggles. … Thoughtful parallels between discrimination based on race and sexual orientation are also skillfully interwoven.While not romantic, Wren and Tim’s relationship becomes another powerful iteration of the book’s message that ”[l]ove is love,“ and all loves deserve respect.” — Kirkus

Rabbit Ears by Maggie de Vries (HarperCollins)

Book Description: Kaya, who is adopted and multiracial, has just been released from a Youth Detention Centre and is carrying a painful secret: she was sexually abused by a neighbor for years. Kaya keeps away, repeatedly disappearing into a life of sex work and addiction. Meanwhile, her sister, Beth, uses food and a rediscovered love of magic tricks to escape her own troubles. Though both girls struggle through darkness and pain, they eventually find their way towards a moment of illumination and healing.
This powerful YA novel is rooted in the tragic life of the author’s sister, Sarah-a victim of serial killer Robert Pickton and the subject of Maggie de Vries’s Governor General’s Literary Award-nominated memoir for adults, Missing Sarah. Sarah’s experiences as an abused child and teen runaway inspired the character Kaya, and she appears in the story when Kaya meets her on the streets. Set in 1998, Vancouver’s missing women form a subtle backdrop for the story.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson (HarperTeen)

“Caddie is starting over: she’s earned a spot at the performing arts high school for her junior year, and reconnects with an old friend in doing so. … This novel offers a good look at Obesseive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, though it stops short of exploring treatment and recovery.” — School Library Journal

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:

The Secret Sky: A Novel of Forbidden Love in Afghanistan by Atia Abawi

“Three characters take turns narrating foreign correspondent Abawi’s debut, about a cross-cultural love affair that tears at a small Afghan community. … A suspenseful, enlightening, and hopeful love story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Zac & Mia by A. J. Betts (HMH Books for Young Readers)

“Seventeen-year-old Zac is recovering from a bone marrow transplant when a loud new patient moves into the room next door. While Zac thinks he knows all there is to know about cancer…Mia’s arrival proves that he does not know everything. The two develop a friendship and learn to see beyond their own sickness and circumstances. … Zac & Mia holds its own as a smart, well-crafted story about the importance of friendship and feeling understood.” — School Library Journal, starred review

The Boy I Love by Nina de Gramont (Atheneum)

“Wren’s infatuation with handsome charmer Tim takes on an unexpected emotional depth after Tim reveals that he is gay. Their friendship blossoms as she becomes a fiercely loyal defender of his secret, while he offers her emotional support during her family’s financial struggles. … Thoughtful parallels between discrimination based on race and sexual orientation are also skillfully interwoven.While not romantic, Wren and Tim’s relationship becomes another powerful iteration of the book’s message that ”[l]ove is love,“ and all loves deserve respect.” — Kirkus

Rabbit Ears by Maggie de Vries (HarperCollins)

Book Description: Kaya, who is adopted and multiracial, has just been released from a Youth Detention Centre and is carrying a painful secret: she was sexually abused by a neighbor for years. Kaya keeps away, repeatedly disappearing into a life of sex work and addiction. Meanwhile, her sister, Beth, uses food and a rediscovered love of magic tricks to escape her own troubles. Though both girls struggle through darkness and pain, they eventually find their way towards a moment of illumination and healing.

This powerful YA novel is rooted in the tragic life of the author’s sister, Sarah-a victim of serial killer Robert Pickton and the subject of Maggie de Vries’s Governor General’s Literary Award-nominated memoir for adults, Missing Sarah. Sarah’s experiences as an abused child and teen runaway inspired the character Kaya, and she appears in the story when Kaya meets her on the streets. Set in 1998, Vancouver’s missing women form a subtle backdrop for the story.

Don’t Touch by Rachel M. Wilson (HarperTeen)

“Caddie is starting over: she’s earned a spot at the performing arts high school for her junior year, and reconnects with an old friend in doing so. … This novel offers a good look at Obesseive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and other anxiety disorders, though it stops short of exploring treatment and recovery.” — School Library Journal

And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.

Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.

Gene Luen Yang’s speech at the National Book Festival 2014 (via kceyagi)

(Source: elloellenoh, via kceyagi)

Read This: Gene Luen Yang’s rousing comics speech at the 2014 National Book Festival gala
From the Washington Post, article here.
GENE LUEN YANG, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building:
Good evening. Thank you, Library of Congress and National Book Festival, for inviting me to share the stage with such esteemed authors, and to speak with all of you. I am deeply grateful for this honor.
I’m a comic-book guy, so tonight I’d like to talk about another comic book guy. Dwayne McDuffie was one of my favorite writers. When I was growing up, he was one of the few African-Americans working in American comics. Dwayne worked primarily within the superhero genre. He got his start at Marvel Comics but eventually worked for almost every comic book publisher out there. He even branched out into television and wrote for popular cartoon series like “Justice League” and “Ben 10.”
Dwayne McDuffie
Dwayne McDuffie is no longer with us, unfortunately. He passed away in 2011, at the age of 49. But within comics, his influence is still deeply felt.
I was lucky enough to have met him once. About a year before his death, we were on a panel together at Comic-Con. I had the opportunity to shake his hand and tell him how much his work meant to me.
In a column Dwayne wrote in 1999, he talked about his love of the Black Panther, a Marvel Comics character. The Black Panther’s secret alias is T’Challa, the king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. He has super senses, super strength, and super agility. He’s an Avenger, though he hasn’t yet made it into the movies.
The Black Panther wasn’t created by African American cartoonists. He was created in July of 1966 by two Jewish Americans, Stan Lee (who was born Stanley Lieber) and Jack Kirby (who was born Jacob Kurtzberg).
By modern standards, the Black Panther is not a flawless example of a black superhero. In their first draft of the character, Lee and Kirby called him “the Coal Tiger” and gave him a goofy yellow and black costume. Even in his final form, his superhero alias includes the word “Black.” This is true of many early African and African American superheroes, as if what makes them remarkable is neither their superpowers nor their heroism, but their ethnicity. Most problematic, though, was that Marvel made their most prominent black superhero the star of a series called Jungle Action.
All of these flaws were lost on Dwayne McDuffie when he first encountered the Black Panther in 1973, at the age of 11. What struck him was the character’s commanding sense of dignity. The Black Panther wasn’t anyone’s sidekick. He wasn’t an angry thug. He wasn’t a victim. He was his own hero, his own man. As Dwayne describes it, “In the space of 15 pages, black people moved from invisible to inevitable.”
Dwayne’s love of the Black Panther eventually blossomed into a love of comics in general. Dwayne was a smart guy with a lot of options in life. He’d earned a master’s degree in physics. But he chose to write comics as his career. I would argue that without the Black Panther, this flawed black character created by a writer and an artist who were not black, there would be no Dwayne McDuffie the comic book writer.
Dwayne wasn’t just a writer — he was also a businessman. In the early ’90s, he teamed with a group of writers and artists to found Milestone Media, the most prominent minority-owned comic book company that has ever existed. The Milestone universe have since been folded into DC Comics, so these days characters like Static Shock and Icon – characters Dwayne co-created – fight crime alongside Superman and Batman.
In the early ’90s, I was finishing up my adolescence. I visited my local comic-book store on a weekly basis, and one week I found a book on the stands called Xombi, published by Milestone Media. Xombi is a scientist who became a superhero after he was injected with nanotechnology. He allied himself with a secret order of superpowered nuns. One sister was known as Nun of the Above, another Nun the Less. Together, they protected the world from all kinds of supernatural threats.
Xombi was inventive and fun, but he stood out to me because he was an Asian American male carrying in his own monthly title. And even more notable – he didn’t know Kung Fu. Xombi wasn’t created by Asian Americans – his writer was white and his artist black – but he did make Asian Americans a little less invisible.
We in the book community are in the middle of a sustained conversation about diversity. We talk about our need for diverse books with diverse characters written by diverse writers. I wholeheartedly agree.
But I have noticed an undercurrent of fear in many of our discussions. We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.
This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities. After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.
I told you the story of Dwayne McDuffie to encourage all of us to be generous with ourselves and with one another. The Black Panther, despite his flaws, was able to inspire a young African American reader to become a writer.
We have to allow ourselves the freedom to make mistakes, including cultural mistakes, in our first drafts. I believe it’s okay to get cultural details wrong in your first draft. It’s okay if stereotypes emerge. It just means that your experience is limited, that you’re human.
Just make sure you iron them out before the final draft. Make sure you do your homework. Make sure your early readers include people who are a part of the culture you’re writing about. Make sure your editor has the insider knowledge to help you out. If they don’t, consider hiring a freelance editor who does.
Also, it’s okay if stereotypes emerge in the first drafts of your colleagues. Correct them – definitely correct them – but do so in a spirit of generosity. Remember how soul-wrenching the act of writing is, how much courage it took for that writer to put words down on a page.
And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.
Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.

Read This: Gene Luen Yang’s rousing comics speech at the 2014 National Book Festival gala

From the Washington Post, article here.

GENE LUEN YANG, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building:

Good evening. Thank you, Library of Congress and National Book Festival, for inviting me to share the stage with such esteemed authors, and to speak with all of you. I am deeply grateful for this honor.

I’m a comic-book guy, so tonight I’d like to talk about another comic book guy. Dwayne McDuffie was one of my favorite writers. When I was growing up, he was one of the few African-Americans working in American comics. Dwayne worked primarily within the superhero genre. He got his start at Marvel Comics but eventually worked for almost every comic book publisher out there. He even branched out into television and wrote for popular cartoon series like “Justice League” and “Ben 10.”

Dwayne McDuffie is no longer with us, unfortunately. He passed away in 2011, at the age of 49. But within comics, his influence is still deeply felt.

I was lucky enough to have met him once. About a year before his death, we were on a panel together at Comic-Con. I had the opportunity to shake his hand and tell him how much his work meant to me.

In a column Dwayne wrote in 1999, he talked about his love of the Black Panther, a Marvel Comics character. The Black Panther’s secret alias is T’Challa, the king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. He has super senses, super strength, and super agility. He’s an Avenger, though he hasn’t yet made it into the movies.

The Black Panther wasn’t created by African American cartoonists. He was created in July of 1966 by two Jewish Americans, Stan Lee (who was born Stanley Lieber) and Jack Kirby (who was born Jacob Kurtzberg).

By modern standards, the Black Panther is not a flawless example of a black superhero. In their first draft of the character, Lee and Kirby called him “the Coal Tiger” and gave him a goofy yellow and black costume. Even in his final form, his superhero alias includes the word “Black.” This is true of many early African and African American superheroes, as if what makes them remarkable is neither their superpowers nor their heroism, but their ethnicity. Most problematic, though, was that Marvel made their most prominent black superhero the star of a series called Jungle Action.

All of these flaws were lost on Dwayne McDuffie when he first encountered the Black Panther in 1973, at the age of 11. What struck him was the character’s commanding sense of dignity. The Black Panther wasn’t anyone’s sidekick. He wasn’t an angry thug. He wasn’t a victim. He was his own hero, his own man. As Dwayne describes it, “In the space of 15 pages, black people moved from invisible to inevitable.”

Dwayne’s love of the Black Panther eventually blossomed into a love of comics in general. Dwayne was a smart guy with a lot of options in life. He’d earned a master’s degree in physics. But he chose to write comics as his career. I would argue that without the Black Panther, this flawed black character created by a writer and an artist who were not black, there would be no Dwayne McDuffie the comic book writer.

Dwayne wasn’t just a writer — he was also a businessman. In the early ’90s, he teamed with a group of writers and artists to found Milestone Media, the most prominent minority-owned comic book company that has ever existed. The Milestone universe have since been folded into DC Comics, so these days characters like Static Shock and Icon – characters Dwayne co-created – fight crime alongside Superman and Batman.

In the early ’90s, I was finishing up my adolescence. I visited my local comic-book store on a weekly basis, and one week I found a book on the stands called Xombi, published by Milestone Media. Xombi is a scientist who became a superhero after he was injected with nanotechnology. He allied himself with a secret order of superpowered nuns. One sister was known as Nun of the Above, another Nun the Less. Together, they protected the world from all kinds of supernatural threats.

Xombi was inventive and fun, but he stood out to me because he was an Asian American male carrying in his own monthly title. And even more notable – he didn’t know Kung Fu. Xombi wasn’t created by Asian Americans – his writer was white and his artist black – but he did make Asian Americans a little less invisible.

We in the book community are in the middle of a sustained conversation about diversity. We talk about our need for diverse books with diverse characters written by diverse writers. I wholeheartedly agree.

But I have noticed an undercurrent of fear in many of our discussions. We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.

This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.
After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.

I told you the story of Dwayne McDuffie to encourage all of us to be generous with ourselves and with one another. The Black Panther, despite his flaws, was able to inspire a young African American reader to become a writer.

We have to allow ourselves the freedom to make mistakes, including cultural mistakes, in our first drafts. I believe it’s okay to get cultural details wrong in your first draft. It’s okay if stereotypes emerge. It just means that your experience is limited, that you’re human.

Just make sure you iron them out before the final draft. Make sure you do your homework. Make sure your early readers include people who are a part of the culture you’re writing about. Make sure your editor has the insider knowledge to help you out. If they don’t, consider hiring a freelance editor who does.

Also, it’s okay if stereotypes emerge in the first drafts of your colleagues. Correct them – definitely correct them – but do so in a spirit of generosity. Remember how soul-wrenching the act of writing is, how much courage it took for that writer to put words down on a page.

And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.

Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.

Big Hair, Don't Care by Crystal Swain-Bates might be good to add to your list of books for children 3-5.

And the illustrations are lovely! Thank you for the recommendation. 

~JB

Buttons, buttons, buttons! 
There will be a limited number of #WNDB buttons and bookmarks at the NAIBA Fall Conference in Arlington, VA, and also at NCTE in November. We are also working on a CafePress site, and are planning a crowd sourcing campaign that will have various levels of #WNDB perks.
If you can’t be there to get a physical button, though, feel free to grab a virtual #WNDB button on the sidebar!

Buttons, buttons, buttons! 

There will be a limited number of #WNDB buttons and bookmarks at the NAIBA Fall Conference in Arlington, VA, and also at NCTE in November. We are also working on a CafePress site, and are planning a crowd sourcing campaign that will have various levels of #WNDB perks.

If you can’t be there to get a physical button, though, feel free to grab a virtual #WNDB button on the sidebar!

cbcdiversity:

The Dear Book Publishers series is a showcase of letters written by 5th graders from Dothan Brook School. These students were tasked with looking at the diversity in their school library’s picture book collection along with the race of children featured on Kindergarten Second Step cards. Reacting to what they had learned, the students wrote letters to book publishers, the Vermont Agency of Education, the school principal, and the district superintendent. During the month of August, CBC Diversity will showcase all of the letters created by the Dothan Brook School’s 5th grade class.
cbcdiversity:

The Dear Book Publishers series is a showcase of letters written by 5th graders from Dothan Brook School. These students were tasked with looking at the diversity in their school library’s picture book collection along with the race of children featured on Kindergarten Second Step cards. Reacting to what they had learned, the students wrote letters to book publishers, the Vermont Agency of Education, the school principal, and the district superintendent. During the month of August, CBC Diversity will showcase all of the letters created by the Dothan Brook School’s 5th grade class.

cbcdiversity:

The Dear Book Publishers series is a showcase of letters written by 5th graders from Dothan Brook School. These students were tasked with looking at the diversity in their school library’s picture book collection along with the race of children featured on Kindergarten Second Step cards. Reacting to what they had learned, the students wrote letters to book publishers, the Vermont Agency of Education, the school principal, and the district superintendent. During the month of August, CBC Diversity will showcase all of the letters created by the Dothan Brook School’s 5th grade class.

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